Why You Should Use Vitamins For Hypothyroidism

Vitamins for hypothyroidism are very important during the treatment. If you are not already aware, hypothyroidism is when your thyroid gland is not producing needed levels of the thyroid hormone. It can happen due to several reasons for example after getting treatments which involve radiation and come in contact with the neck (which is where the thyroid gland is located) like the one during treating the cancer process. It can also be caused following the removing of thyroid or maybe even just partial removal for addressing another problem related to the thyroid gland.

It may also be caused in women after they go through the pregnancy. A few symptoms of hypothyroidism include the pain in your joints, infections, skin dryness, gain in weight, digestion problems, weak hair and nails, fatigue etc. If left untreated it could lead to bigger problems like numbness when it comes to smelling or being able to taste, it may even cause swelling in of your face etc.

When you take vitamins for hypothyroidism you need to keep a very important pointer in mind, do not take vitamins right before your prescribed medicine, take them at least some hours before. This is because they might prevent the effective absorption thus effect of the medicine. Before taking vitamins for hypothyroidism do ask your doctor, so that you take the right quantities and not end up in more trouble than before. As taking extra or overdosing on vitamins can cause abnormal levels of thyroid hormone too.

Now coming towards the positive effects or importance of vitamins for hypothyroidism. An important symptom of hypothyroidism is feeling tired and unusually lazy in short fatigue. Taking vitamins for hypothyroidism might help you with this problem, especially if you already have developed vitamin deficiencies, then you may see a lot of improvement. Although, as mentioned before do not take it without the consultation of your doctor neither immediately before your hypothyroidism medicine.

Interesting Questions about Thyroid:

Pregnancy & Thyroid Disease

Why are women more likely to get thyroid disease?

In general, women are much more likely than men to become hyperthyroid or hypothyroid and to get Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. The reason for this is uncertain.

Women are also more vulnerable to autoimmune diseases. Two of the most common thyroid diseases, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves’ disease, are caused by problems with the body’s immune system. Normally, the immune system defends the body against germs and viruses. In autoimmune diseases, the system attacks the body’s own tissues. Diseases of the immune system tend to run in families.

What about thyroid disease and pregnancy?

Hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism can affect a woman’s ability to become pregnant. They may also cause a miscarriage if they are not quickly recognized and properly treated.

Women who become pregnant may not notice signs of thyroid disease because similar symptoms can occur in a normal pregnancy. For example, patients may feel warm, tired, nervous, or shaky. In addition, enlargement of the thyroid (goiter) commonly occurs during pregnancy.

A pregnant woman is treated differently than is a non-pregnant woman or a man. For example, radioactive materials commonly used in diagnosing and treating many thyroid diseases are never used in pregnant women. The timing of a biopsy or surgery for a thyroid nodule and the choice of drugs for hyperthyroidism may be different in a pregnant woman. These issues require careful consultation with your doctor.

What is postpartum thyroiditis?

Postpartum thyroiditis is a temporary form of thyroiditis. It occurs in 5%-9% of women soon after giving birth (postpartum period). The effects are usually mild. However, the disease may recur with future pregnancies.

The symptoms usually last for six to nine months. First, the damaged thyroid gland may release its stored thyroid hormones into the blood, causing hyperthyroidism. During this time, you can develop a goiter, have a fast heart rate, and feel warm or anxious. Then, a few months later, you will either return to normal or become hypothyroid. Hypothyroidism occurs because the thyroid has been damaged and its hormone reserves used up. If this happens, you may feel tired, weak, or cold. The hypothyroidism usually lasts a few months until the thyroid gland completely recovers. Occasionally, the hypothyroidism may be permanent.

How do doctors test for thyroid disease during pregnancy?

As with any disease, it is important that you watch for the early warning signs of thyroid disease. However, only your doctor can tell for sure whether or not you have the disease. Your doctor may examine:

  • your history and physical appearance
  • the amount of thyroid hormones, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), and thyroid antibodies in your blood.

How is thyroid disease treated during pregnancy?

Pregnancy places some limits on the treatments which you can receive, because your doctor must also look out for the safety of your child. A common treatment for hyperthyroidism is radioactive iodine, but it must be avoided by women who are pregnant or nursing a baby. Surgery to remove a goiter or cancer may also be delayed until after the pregnancy. However, needle aspiration biopsy of a thyroid nodule may be safely done during pregnancy.

Treatments which may be used for thyroid disease during pregnancy include:

Postpartum thyroiditis may or may not be treated during the hyperthyroid stage, depending upon its severity. If the patient later becomes hypothyroid, her doctor may prescribe thyroid hormone pills.

What are the Signs and Symptoms of Hyperthyroidism?

Signs and symptoms of Hyperthyroidism may include:

  • fast heart rate (100-120 beats per minute or higher)
  • slightly elevated blood pressure
  • nervousness or irritability
  • increased perspiration
  • muscle weakness (especially in the shoulders, hips, and thighs)
  • trembling hands
  • weight loss, in spite of a good appetite
  • hair loss
  • fingernails partially separated from finger-tips (onycholysis)
  • swollen fingertips (achropachy or clubbing)
  • retracted (pulled back) upper eyelids
  • skin changes
  • increased frequency of bowel movements
  • goiter (an abnormal swelling in the neck caused by an enlarged thyroid gland)
  • in women, decreased menstrual flow and less frequent menstrual flow
  • in men, slight swelling of the breasts
  • in Graves’ disease: thick or swollen skin over the shin bones (pretibial myxedema); eyes that seem to be popping out of their socket (exophthalmos).

Most of these conditions will return to normal after the hyperthyroidism is treated. Certain others may be treated separately.

What About Nodules?

What are hot and cold nodules?

Thyroid nodules do not function like normal thyroid tissue. A thyroid image (scan) done with a radioactive chemical shows the size, shape, and function of the gland and of thyroid nodules. A nodule that takes up more of the radioactive material than the rest of the gland is called a hot nodule.

A nodule that takes up less radioactive material is a cold nodule. Hot nodules are seldom cancerous, but less than 10% of all nodules are hot. Cold nodules may or may not be cancerous. All lumps should be checked by your doctor.

How do doctors test nodules for cancer?

Your doctor can use several tests to find out whether or not a thyroid lump is cancerous.

  • A thyroid image or scan shows the size, shape, and function of the gland. It uses a tiny amount of a radioactive chemical, usually iodine or technetium, which the thyroid absorbs from the blood. A special camera then creates a picture, showing how much iodine was absorbed by each part of the gland.
  • In needle aspiration biopsy, a small needle is inserted into the nodule in an effort to suck out (aspirate) cells. If the nodule is a fluid-filled cyst, the aspiration often removes some or all of the fluid. If the nodule is solid, several small samples are removed for examination under the microscope. In over 90% of all cases, this testing tells the doctor whether the lump is benign or malignant.
  • Ultrasound uses high-pitch sound waves to find out whether a nodule is solid or filled with fluid. About 10% of lumps are fluid-filled cysts, and they are usually not cancerous. Ultrasound may also detect other nodules that are not easily felt by the doctor. The presence of multiple nodules reduces the likelihood of cancer.

How are nodules treated?

Nodules that are thought to be benign are usually observed at regular intervals. Some patients may be advised to take thyroid hormone pills. In certain instances, the nodule may be surgically removed because of continuing growth, pressure symptoms in the neck, or for cosmetic reasons.

Fluid-filled cysts that come back after several aspirations may need to be removed.

If the testing shows a nodule that is, or might be, malignant (cancerous), your doctor will recommend surgery. (You should discuss special situations, such as pregnancy, with your doctor.) The goal of surgery is to remove as much of the cancerous tissue as possible. If the cancer is found in the early stages when it is still confined to the thyroid gland, the surgery is almost always successful. With papillary cancer, patients usually do well after treatment, even if the cancer has spread to the lymph nodes in the neck.

The surgeon starts by removing one lobe of the thyroid. This specimen is tested during surgery (frozen section) to tell the surgeon whether it is benign or malignant. If it is malignant, most or all of the thyroid is removed. If the cancer has spread, lymph nodes in the neck may also have to be removed. In addition, in patients with either papillary or follicular cancer, radioactive iodine therapy may be needed six weeks after surgery to destroy any remaining cancerous tissue.

What happens after surgery?

After surgery, patients must stay in the hospital for one to three days. They may also need to take some time off from work (one to two weeks for a desk job; three to four weeks for physical labor). Most patients do not have any trouble speaking or swallowing, and they report minimal pain after the surgery. In patients with thyroid cancer, a scan may be done approximately six weeks after surgery to detect any residual thyroid tissue that needs to be treated with radioactive iodine.

Patients with thyroid cancer will need to take thyroid hormone their entire lives. Some patients who have had a noncancerous nodule removed will also be advised to take thyroid hormone pills. These may prevent new nodules from forming in the remaining portion of the thyroid gland.

Have more questions? Need more answers? Check our Full Thyroid FAQ

Vitamins for Hypothyroidism

Here are a few vitamins for hypothyroidism that you might find useful in your condition. Dose of Vitamin A may help to boost your immune system as well as help you with proper absorption of iodine it also helps the problem of the dry skin and weak hair which keeps falling and becomes very brittle due to hypothyroidism. Thus, vitamin A is important for the proper functioning of your thyroid gland. Another important vitamin is vitamin B complex, which also is crucial for proper functioning of your thyroid gland. It will help in improving the digestion problems which come along with the hypothyroidism. It may also help boost up your energy level and metabolism. As both these factors energy as well as metabolism are significantly affected by hypothyroidism.

Two more vitamins which are essential for hypothyroidism patients are vitamin C and vitamin D. Vitamin C is known to be an antioxidant, thus it prevents the reactions which can cause damage to cells. Another result of it is that it reduces the cholesterol level too. When combined with vitamin E it will help you build up strength in your immune system. Vitamin D has been recently said to be the most important vitamin needed in the condition of hypothyroidism activity of your thyroid gland depends on the presence of this particular vitamin which makes it very essential. The treatment for hypothyroidism might not even effectively work if your vitamin D level is not sufficient; it thus is stimulator for your thyroid gland.

You can even take all these as multivitamins. When you choose to do so you have to make more sure than the multivitamin complex you’ve selected contains all of these vitamins mentioned above and in the right amounts. So that your vitamin intake ends up being effective.

Donna Morgan

Donna Morgan

Crank It is where inspiration, aspiration and solution converge to make things ‘happen’. Turn on your life or turn it around and see where it takes you!

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